Lizard Point Quizzes

...discovering the world we live in

Water water everywhere... now you can customize it

May 292017

Looking for a water quiz? We've got quizzes. We've got water. You've come to the right place.


We've just launched a customizable quiz with over 200 bodies of water (oceans, seas, bays, gulfs, straits, channels, lakes, rivers...) from all over the world.  The base quiz (before customization) is a quiz that currently has 215 questions. We didn't think anyone would want to do a quiz with that many questions, so we didn't put it in the site menu, but you can try the full world water quiz here.

If you'd like to see a customized water quiz in action, I set up a short straits and channels quiz with just 14 questions. I realized afterwards that I missed the Strait of Magellan, but I'll try to get that added in later. Word of warning - just because it's short doesn't mean it's easy!

If you'd like to create your own customized water quiz with just the questions you want to include, we've set it up initially as an "everyone has access" feature - anyone with an account (free or premium) can customize the world water quiz.

Go ahead and try it! Create your own customized water quiz.

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A handful of new quizzes

Feb 252017

New Quizzes added in February 2017.  More quizzes will follow in a couple of weeks...


  • North America bodies of water:  there are 16 questions in this quiz, and it's customizable for premium members.

  • Canada Seas, Lakes, Bays, Rivers:  we've combined the smaller Bodies of Water, and Rivers quizzes to make one bigger quiz with 37 questions. And it's customizable for all account holders.

  • Spain autonomies quiz: the first level administrative divisions are called autonomous communities. 19 questions.

New customizations available:

Russia - that big, confusing country : simplified!

Feb 162017

Russia has been in the news a fair bit lately, and perhaps you have decided it is time to learn a little bit more about Russia. Perhaps you noticed the news recently - that over a course of several days (February 6 - 15, 2017), five Russian heads resigned... heads of the the  republics of Karelia and Buryatia, and the governors of  Novgorod and Ryazan oblasts, as well as the governor of Perm krai. And then your next thought, without a doubt, was, "Wait, what are these oblasts, republics and krais anyway?"

So here you are, about to find out. 

Russia, officially known as the Russian Federation, is made up of 85 federal subjects - republics, krais, oblasts, autonomous okrugs,  federal cities and an autonomous oblast. It can be pretty confusing to understand the differences, and keep straight what's what and where.

So I've brought you a couple of resources that might help you out a bit. 

First up, a youtube video by VanDeGraph:  Russian Federation Explained. Watch this video to learn the history of how the various federal subjects came to be, and what their primary differences are in terms of powers.

 

 

If you want to memorize the names of the federal subjects and where they are, you could watch this next video. It's cheesy and annoying, and you probably STILL won't know where all the federal subjects are, but you will hear how to pronounce their names... and the chorus is catchy. 

 


If you prefer reading to watching videos, this Wikipedia article explains the federal subjects

Chances are, you still can't name them all or place them on a map... 'cause c'mon, there are 85 of them and it's no easy task. So we've turned our Russian: federal subjects quiz into a customizable quiz.  This way, you can pick which ones you want to start with, and learn at your own pace. The Russian: federal subjects quiz can be customized by anyone with a free account on Lizard Point Quizzes.

Or you could try one of these quizzes to start off:

Good luck!

 

 

 

 

 

A new type of student account: Student-owned accounts

Aug 262016

If you're a teacher of students that are 13 years of age and older, and your students sign up for accounts themselves, you might find our new account type of interest: Student-owned accounts that are connected to a teacher account.

A quick review of Teacher accounts and their student accounts

Until now, if a teacher wants to monitor their students' activity, the teacher must create generated accounts and hand them out to the students. And give everyone the same password. And keep track of whose account is whose. This is an ideal solution for maintaining the privacy and safety of children under 13 on the internet.  But it may not be ideal for teachers of a large number of students in higher grades.

Introducing... Student-owned accounts connected to your teacher account

With student-owned accounts, students can sign up for their own accounts, and maintain their own passwords. Sounds like just a regular account that has always been available? Not quite - now anyone with a regular (non-teacher) account will see a new option in their My Account menu: Join or Leave Class.

Join or Leave class on the My Account menu

If you, the teacher, have one or more classes set up in your account, you can instruct your students to use the Join a Class option to connect their account to yours. When they do that, they will be prompted to fill in the alias/nickname and give you permission to access their results.   The alias/nickname will be what you see on your class results listing (thus saving you some work figuring out who's who).

screenshot of filling out the Join Class screen

This option is available for both Teacher Basic and Teacher Plus accounts , but please note that you need a Teacher Plus account to view your student scores (Teacher Basic will just show you that the student completed the quiz - not the score).

 We have more information for you here about the two types of student accounts, and details about the process of Joining a class.


Need your class to take a quiz in strict test mode?

Jul 312016

We've just introduced a new feature that has been requested by some of our teachers: you can now force a quiz to go into strict test mode (with the other modes disabled).  

If you've ever given your students a test, and and asked them to use strict test mode, you might have been frustrated by the one or two students who missed following your instructions. Problem solved! You can now set up a customized quiz that goes directly into strict test mode, with no mode change options on the screen at all.

Here is what you'll end up with: notice in the screenshot below that the quiz is in strict test mode - 1 point per question ie only one guess, no map or show me buttons, and no buttons to change the quiz to practice mode or test mode.

screenshot of a quiz forced to strict test modescreenshot of a quiz forced to strict test mode

 

How to set up a quiz like this yourself

First, you must be signed in (to either a Teacher Plus account, or an Individual Supporter account), and select a quiz from the customize a quiz page.

On the customize screen you will see a new set of options, Quiz Mode Options, just below the options for coloring the map. Here's a screenshot of a customize screen, with a red circle around the new options:

screenshot of where to find the mode optionsScreenshot of where to find the mode options

The default option is that the Practice, test and strict test options are all available - this is the the standard quiz behavior that you're all familiar with. Select the second option, Force strict test mode, as shown in this little screen shot:

force strict test option
Force strict test radio button



After entering your title, description, selecting your locations, and your mode option, hit the save button, and you are done! You've got yourself a quiz that behaves ONLY in strict mode.  This is a great option to set up a quiz to use just for testing.  You can continue to use standard quizzes, or customize quizzes without this option, for your students to be able to practice and prepare for their tests.

Try this Demo quiz in Strict Test Mode

I've set up a Demo Quiz of 16 countries in Europe so you can try out what it's like when you use this feature.

Save your favorite quizzes

Jul 192016

Here's a quick run-through of the new feature: Favorite A Quiz.

If you're a teacher, and you want to put quizzes for your students on your (soon to be released) blackboard, this feature is going to help you get your quizzes there.

If you're a learner, favoriting a quiz is a way to keep all your favorite quizzes bookmarked in one spot. You might want to do this if you've got several quizzes you're studying for, or are frequently practicing. You can remove a quiz from your favorites just as easily.

Here's how it works...

Every quiz in the geography section has (or will soon have) a star just above the Question and Answer box. You just click on the star to mark the quiz as a favorite. It will turn from an outline to a solid star to show that it has been saved as a favorite. 

Screenshot of how to save a quiz as a favorite Screenshot of how to save a quiz as a favorite



 Screenshot of a quiz that has been saved as a favorite Screenshot of a quiz that has been saved as a favorite

If you want to remove the quiz from your favorites, just click the solid star, and it will revert back to the original outline (unfavorited) star.

When you want to see your favorites, go to your My Account menu (yes, you have to be signed in for your favorites to be saved and viewed) and select My Favorite Quizzes.

Screenshot of navigation to My Favorites screen

Screenshot of navigation to My Favorites screen


Below is a screenshot of what the My Favorite Quizzes screen looks like. As you can see, you can also remove quizzes from your favorites here.

Screenshot of My Favorites screen Screenshot of My Favorites screen

Favoriting a quiz is available to Individual Supporters, those with a Teacher Plus account, and students of a Teacher Plus.

Stay tuned for a blog post on how this fits in with the new blackboard feature.