Lizard Point Quizzes

...discovering the world we live in

Good (and terrible) flag designs

Jan 252016

 You see flags everywhere, flying from porches, over buildings, on boats and even on team jerseys.   Do you ever stop and wonder what goes into a good flag design?  Or what constitutes a really bad design?  Here's a fun TED talk that covers all this off for you.  If you don't have time to listen to it all, here are the top 5 flag design principles:

  • Keep it Simple
  • Use Meaningful Symbolism
  • Use Two to Three Basic Colours
  • No Lettering or Seals
  • Be Distinctive or Be Related

But watch the video (especially the part about the bad designs).

Bonus sections:  Design your own flag here >>

 

Google technology helps students learn earth’s geography

Jan 192016

The folks at Google are piloting an interesting immersive geography program that might interest some of our readers.undefined

The gist of the program is a to take students on a kind of virtual expedition where they can experience more than 100 interesting journeys.  These simulated journeys could include a visit to the South Pole, coral reefs or ancient American ruins.  With the Expedition Kit, students will be able to look up and down, and spin to get a 360-degree view of a location, as if they were visiting in person.

Expeditions teams will visit selected schools around the world, including the United States, Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Brazil, Canada, Singapore and Denmark. Each team will bring a complete Expeditions kit with everything the teachers need to take their students on journeys anywhere. The team will show teachers how Expeditions works and help set it up before class.

There is no charge or cost involved in the program.  You just need 6 interested teachers.

Visit Googles page to sign up to let them know you’d like the Expeditions Pioneer Program to stop at your school. Or read about another school's experience with the program.  

 

 

New map-flag quizzes

Jan 162016

We've just launched two new quizzes to test your country flag knowledge. We'll show you a flag, you have to find the country on the map. The Africa and Europe versions have been around a long time: now we've got an Americas flag quiz as well as an Asia flag quiz

As promised, our supporters get early access to new quizzes and features. For everyone else, the new quizzes will open up to you on February 1, 2016.

screenthot of the Americas flag quiz

 

 

The area of this map coloured red has the same population as the area coloured blue

Jan 132016

 Another very interesting visualization of world population from the folks in Reddit.  Only 5 per cent of the world's population lives in the regions of this map shaded blue. Another 5 per cent lives in the area shaded red.

undefined

Reddit MapPorn - account IbisDigitalMedia

We found the map in a very interesting article from the web site CityMetric, who included some interesting facts and deduction.

According to CityMetric, the red area includes Bangladesh (pop: 156m), and the Indian states of Bihar (pop: 104m) and West Bengal (pop: 91m). It also includes two megacities: Kolkata in West Bengal (15m), and the Bangladeshi capital of Dhaka (13m).  In all, that’s a combined population of about 351m people in roughly 330,000 km2, giving a population density of 1062 people per km2.

The blue area includes Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, huge swathes of northern and Asian Russia, Mongolia, most of the Amazon basin, Patagonia, large swathes of Africa and the Arabic peninsula, the US states of New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Kansas, Nebraska, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, and both Dakotas, and pretty much the entire Australasian continent.

As CityMetric points out, the map is a bit of a cheat. They've assumed that whoever made the map calculated how many people 5 per cent of the global population is, and then started working their way down a list of big areas with low population density until they hit their magic number. It’s a slightly artificial way of doing things, and leads to odd things like the exclusion of the Nile valley and the thin sliver of South America on its populated Pacific Coast.